THE ALLIANCE


 

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The First Nations Wild Salmon Alliance (the Alliance) is a First Nations lead alliance fighting for Wild Salmon protection with strong grassroots support, envisioning a Salmon Nation. The Alliance was created for the benefit of members of First Nations to provide support to First Nations interested in exploring and implementing measures designed to support and protect Wild Salmon stocks and is properly mandated to carry out this important capacity work by the three province wide organizations (First Nations Summit, the Union of BC Indian Chiefs and the BC Assembly of First Nations). Operations of the Alliance are entirely self-funded through grants, financial and other resource donations and through various funding proposals. The Alliance welcome suggestions for future activities and measures to support its objectives and work.

ABOUT THE EVENT


 

The First Nations Wild Salmon Alliance is convening this solution-oriented, two-day strategic dialogue session on April 18 and 19, 2016 in Vancouver. The session will bring together the best and brightest minds in a dialogue about the future of wild salmon. The objective of this session is to advance the goal of ensuring wild salmon forever, that is, to ensure a sustainable stock of wild salmon for the foreseeable future. More specifically:

 

  • Explore existing recommendations and strategies intended to support the health and vitality of wild salmon, with a specific focus on the findings of the Cohen Commission Report;
  • Share information, educate and build First Nations capacity in regard to issues such as: various threats to the sustainability of wild salmon stocks, including impacts of fish farming; and
  • Identify actions to address threats and support sustainability of wild salmon, assist First Nations by providing further capacity development at the technical and political levels; and
  • Assist in setting a clear path for First Nations to engage with government, consistent with commitment to revisit legislation, regulations, policies, and best practices.

AGENDA



ACCOMMODATIONS


FINAL REPORT


From Chief Bob Chamberlin:

I am very pleased with the outcome and Final Report of the Wild Salmon Strategic Dialogue Session.
 
There was broad representation of First Nations from across BC, along with numerous ENGO’s and other organizations who wish to see Wild Salmon as a key priority for the New Federal Liberal Government.
 
There is tangible hope in seeing Prime Minister Trudeau’s government achieve its stated commitments.
 
This report is advanced to establish a broad-based partnership, led by First Nations and focused on working with the DFO to redevelop once healthy and abundant Wild Salmon runs, province-wide, in British Columbia.

Read the Final Report:

STRATEGY SESSION FACULTY – PRESENTATIONS AND BIOS


  • Dan Lewis
    Dan Lewis
  • Lisa Glowacki
    Lisa Glowacki
  • Chief Darrell Bob
    Chief Darrell Bob
  • Mark Duiven
    Mark Duiven
  • Dr. Jonathan Moore
    Dr. Jonathan Moore
  • Brenda Gaertner
    Brenda Gaertner
  • Eric Hobson
    Eric Hobson
  • Grand Chief Robert Pasco
    Grand Chief Robert Pasco
  • Dr. Brian Riddell
    Dr. Brian Riddell
    President and CEO, Pacific Salmon Foundation
  • Dr. Lawrence Dill, PhD, FRSC
    Dr. Lawrence Dill, PhD, FRSC
  • Stan Proboszcz, M.Sc.
    Stan Proboszcz, M.Sc.
    Science Advisor, Watershed Watch Salmon Society
  • Dr. Craig Orr, M.Sc., Pd.D
    Dr. Craig Orr, M.Sc., Pd.D
    Conservation Advisor
  • Alexandra Morton
    Alexandra Morton
    Biologist
  • Robert Chamberlin
    Robert Chamberlin
    Elected Chief Councillor Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation & Vice President, Union of BC Indian Chiefs
  • Tyrone McNeil
    Tyrone McNeil
Dan Lewis

Dan Lewis is Executive Director of Clayoquot Action, a conservation society based in Tofino, British Columbia. Dan’s background in ecotourism and salmon habitat restoration connect him to the need to protect lands and waters for future generations. Living in Tofino since 1991, Dan helped to organize the mass protests of Clayoquot Summer 1993. In his spare time Dan likes to sing out loud when no-one is listening.

Lisa Glowacki

Lisa Glowacki advises and represents First Nations on matters relating to resource use, crown obligations, and aboriginal rights and title. Over the years, her practice has developed a focus on fisheries. She was co-counsel on a constitutional challenge to the provincial regulation of aquaculture and was also co-counsel on behalf of the Aquaculture Coalition, led by Alexandra Morton, at the Cohen Commission. She has represented First Nations seeking recognition and implementation of their aboriginal rights to fish, including for food and for economic purposes. Most recently, she has spent the last year in the BCSC as co-counsel representing five Nuu-chah-nulth Nations, whose aboriginal rights to fish and sell fish were declared by the court in 2009, in a trial to determine whether the federal government can justify its infringement of those aboriginal rights. Lisa began working with the Nuu-chah-nulth Nations in the original litigation that resulted in the declaration of their aboriginal fishing rights and has advised them during the years of negotiation with the federal government that followed. She has also used judicial review of government decisions and injunctions as a means to protect First Nations fisheries interests. Lisa has appeared at all levels of court and is a partner at Ratcliff & Company, LLP.

Chief Darrell Bob

In 2006, Chief Darrell became a leader of his community where he received his most significant teachings about the importance of the lands of his people.  He was taught to look at the whole territory when he made a decision and not just the narrow scope of an initiative.

In 2009, Chief Darrell honoring a profound vision helped initiate the International Indigenous Leadership Gathering in Lillooet, BC. He has continued this gathering of indigenous spiritual leaders, Elders, healers and educators sharing their Sacred Teachings and Traditional ways with natives and non-natives alike.

In 2010 thru 2011, Chief Darrell has also continued his leadership role at the round tables supporting Ancient Indigenous Knowledge.

Mark Duiven

For the last 30 years Mark Duiven has worked as a community development consultant in northern Canada as well as Asia, the Caribbean and Mexico. Mark’s experience has been broad and multi-faceted and has centered on working directly with indigenous people. It includes community economic development, resource management, policy development, and government relations.

Mark has a special interest and considerable experience in the development of fisheries including the development of enforcement and interdiction services, marketing and branding, and the development of partnerships with mainstream seafood distributors. Mark also has considerable experience and interest in environmental assessment and review in the Canadian context – and has served on formal federal review panels. This includes leading teams formally reviewing a number of major projects including the Pacific North West Liquefied Natural Gas proposal for the Prince Rupert, BC area.

Dr. Jonathan Moore

Dr. Jonathan Moore is broadly interested in the ecology and management of aquatic ecosystems. General interests include biodiversity, watersheds, species interactions, biogeochemistry, subsidies, ecosystem engineers, disturbance, and global change. He does much of his work in the freshwaters that Pacific salmon call home and so, not surprisingly, works quite a bit on this group of ecologically important species. Dr. Moore and his students aim to do research that has conservation and management implications, and they use a combination of field experiments, field observations, and modeling.

Brenda Gaertner

Throughout her career, Brenda has worked with Aboriginal people in their pursuit of the recognition of Aboriginal title and rights to healthy fisheries and aquatic resources, helping to find ways to ensure that those fisheries and resources are sustained for present and future generations.  She has a long history of working with First Nation communities along the migratory route of Fraser Salmon, including both the coastal and in-river fisheries.  Brenda cares about these fisheries and the ecosystems upon which they rely, and is excited to be working with First Nations who are actively pursuing land and marine use plans within their territories.

Brenda was senior counsel for the First Nations Coalition in the Cohen Inquiry on Fraser River Sockeye and has represented First Nation clients before the National Energy Board and Joint Federal and Provincial Review Panels.

Eric Hobson

Eric Hobson is chair of Kuterra LP and an engineer, with more than 35 years of experience in the oil and gas, telecommunications, and technology industries. Through Northridge Canada, a private equity firm, Eric co-founded numerous companies, including Northridge Petroleum Marketing (acquired by TransCanada Corp.) and Metronet Communications (acquired by AT&T Canada). Eric is a member of the Institute of Corporate Directors and an experienced director of public and private organizations. He is also an active philanthropist. He was founder and president of the SOS Marine Conservation Foundation, which signed a memorandum of understanding with the ‘Namgis First Nation in 2010 to develop a land-based closed containment aquaculture project to grow Atlantic salmon for market at a commercial scale. This became the ‘Namgis-owned Kuterra in 2011.

Grand Chief Robert Pasco

Grand Chief Bob Pasco is the Chair of the Nlaka’pamux Nation Tribal Council and Chief of his home community Nteqem and Snapa where his family has lived for many generations. Living on the land, he has devoted his life to Nlaka’pamux title and rights to protect and sustain the environment for all and in particular to protect the wild salmon fishery – the lifeblood of the Nlaka’pamux. Grand Chief Bob Pasco has taken a leadership role in stopping developments inconsistent with Nlaka’pamux title and rights including the Moran Dam, Hat Creek Coal and CN Twin Tracking. This has included stopping trains, litigating, winning the now longest standing injunction in the Commonwealth and building new relationships which are respectful of title and rights. He has fought tirelessly against the environmental degradation and threat to the well-being of the river and fishery caused by the garbage dump in Cache Creek. Grand Chief Pasco works from a disciplined and principled perspective offering solutions. He was instrumental in the development of the Inter-Tribal Fishing Treaty – A Treaty of Mutual Purpose and Respect between Indian Nations which provided for Indigenous control of the fishery.

Dr. Brian Riddell
President and CEO, Pacific Salmon Foundation

Dr. Brian Riddell is the President and CEO of the Pacific Salmon Foundation, an independent, non-governmental organization dedicated to creating a sustainable future for wild Pacific salmon and their habitat.

Among numerous professional distinctions, Riddell serves as a member of the Royal Society of Canada’s Expert Panel on Ocean Climate Change and Marine Biodiversity. He is also an appointed Canadian Commissioner to the Pacific Salmon Commission, the body formed by the governments of Canada and the United States to implement the Pacific Salmon Treaty.

Riddell worked for 30 years in various scientific research and management positions with the Government of Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans. Riddell was the scientific lead in the creation of Canada’s Policy for Conservation of Wild Pacific Salmon, for which he received the Government of Canada’s Public Service Distinction Award in 2005. He also contributed to the development of the Pacific Salmon Treaty, the 1985 bi-lateral agreement between Canada and the United States governing management, research and enhancement of Pacific salmon.

Dr. Lawrence Dill, PhD, FRSC

Larry Dill is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biological Sciences at Simon Fraser University. He and his graduate students have carried out extensive studies on the interaction between sea lice and wild salmon, often in collaboration with Dr. Marty Krkosek. Dr. Dill served as a scientific advisor for the BC Pacific Salmon Forum, co-wrote the WWF Aquaculture Dialog report on sea lice, and prepared a report on aquaculture for the Cohen Commission.

Stan Proboszcz, M.Sc.
Science Advisor, Watershed Watch Salmon Society

Mr. Proboszcz has a 20-year background in biology and has conducted research in diverse ecosystems in the United States and Canada. For 10 years, Stan has worked with Watershed Watch and focused on the interactions of wild and farm salmon, particularly in relation to sea lice. He’s an author on several scientific studies on sea lice and collaborated with academics, DFO and industry on sea lice monitoring on wild fish in the Broughton Archipelago. Mr. Proboszcz has participated in stakeholder consultations with all three levels of government and supported First Nations in Tier 1 and 2 discussions.

Stan was also a participant through Watershed Watch in the Cohen Commission into the Decline of Fraser River Sockeye. His evidence was identified by Justice Cohen to expand the Commission’s examination of salmon farming fish health data from 21 farms to 120. Stan is the primary author of a searchable summary report of key exhibits and evidence from the inquiry. After the Cohen Commission report and recommendations were tabled in 2012, Stan was involved in tracking government’s implementation.

Dr. Craig Orr, M.Sc., Pd.D
Conservation Advisor

Dr. Craig Orr holds postgraduate degrees in wildlife ecology (M.Sc., Acadia University) and behavioural ecology (Ph.D., Simon Fraser University). Dr. Orr is the former Executive Director and continuing Conservation Advisor of the Watershed Watch Salmon Society. In his capacity as the former Executive Director, Dr. Orr helped lead Watershed Watch over 16 years in a BC-wide involvement in water use issues, run-of-river planning, groundwater and salmon interactions, aquaculture impacts, the sustainability of salmon fisheries, and engagement organizing. Dr. Orr also continues to be active locally, representing Watershed Watch’s interests on the Coquitlam River Watershed Roundtable and in other processes and projects in the Coquitlam watershed, and advising Kwikwetlem First Nation on various conservation issues, including the long fight to restore Coquitlam sockeye.

Alexandra Morton
Biologist

Alexandra Morton is a biologist living in a remote archipelago in British Columbia, Canada and has studied whales since 1984, raising her children in Echo Bay. Ms. Morton has spent nearly 20 years studying the language and behavior of the orcas, or killer whales, that roam the waters of British Columbia. She has authored two children’s books on whales and is a field scientist focusing on the effects of fish farming, logging, development, and whale-watching expeditions on the environment. Ms. Morton has been culturally adopted into the Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation of the Kwakwa̱ka̱ʼwakw peoples and is also known by the name Gwayum’dzi.

Robert Chamberlin
Elected Chief Councillor Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation & Vice President, Union of BC Indian Chiefs

Chief Bob Chamberlin has been the elected Chief Councillor of Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation since 2005 and previously served as Chair of the Musgamagw-Tsawataineuk Tribal Council. For the past six years, Chief Chamberlin has also served as the Vice-President of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs (UBCIC), actively engaged in the defense of Aboriginal Title and Rights, advocating on issues of concern to First Nations. Much of Chief Chamberlin’s professional career has also been dedicated to advocacy for the safeguarding of wild salmon and habitat. With the assistance of the staff at the UBCIC, Chief Chamberlin founded the First Nations Wild Salmon Alliance, an organization of Indigenous leaders in BC united in their resolve, determination and commitment to ensure the protection and conservation of wild salmon.

Tyrone McNeil

Since 1999 Mr. McNeil has been involved in First Nation education, starting with the local Sto:lo Nation and expanding to provincial and national level involvement. He is actively involved in negotiating education policy, program guidelines and resourcing. Further, since 2005 to present Tyrone has served as the political representative for BC First Nations education on the Chiefs Committee on Education and as the technical representative, as well as President of the First Nation Education Steering Committee. Currently, Mr. McNeil is the Manager of Stqo:ya Construction.

SUPPORTERS


 

The First Nations Wild Salmon Alliance proudly acknowledges the support of the following organizations in delivering this strategic dialogue session

“The Future of Wild Salmon: Advancing a Path Forward to Informed Management and Decision-Making” is presented with strategic support from the Castlemain Group, an Indigenous Services firm.